Native American Artifacts

Artists: Anonymous Artists
Finely woven basket from Puget Sound

Anonymous, Basket from Puget Sound, 1900, woven basket, BYU Museum of Peoples and Cultures, UT.

Commentary by Paul Stavast
Director of the BYU Museum of Peoples and Cultures

Ute leather moccasins

Anonymous, Ute leather moccasins, 1940s, leather moccasins, Brigham Young University Museum of Peoples and Cultures.

Ute leather moccasins with porcupine quills

Anonymous, Ute leather moccasins with porcupine quills, 1920s, leather moccasins with porcupine quills, Brigham Young University Museum of Peoples and Cultures.

Apache tight, coiled basket

Anonymous, Apache tight, coiled basket, Brigham Young University Museum of Peoples and Cultures.

Basket

Anonymous, Basket, Museum of Peoples and Cultures Brigham Young University.

1977.192.96.1

Anonymous, Mogollon Pot, Brigham Young University Museum of Peoples and Cultures.

Rio Grande Pueblo storage jar, jar

Anonymous, Rio Grande Pueble storage jar, Brigham Young University Museum of Peoples and Cultures.

Hopi bowl

Anonymous, Hopi Bowl, 1920s, bowl, Brigham Young University Museum of Peoples and Cultures.

These artifacts were collected by Mildred Miles Dillman while her and her family lived near the Ute reservation in the Uintah Basin in the early 1900s. Mildred taught among the Ute Indians for more than 30 years. Many of those years were spent teaching children at the White Rock Indian School near Roosevelt, Utah. Naomi Dillman Lunt, Mildred’s daughter, remembered her mother inviting the Indians to lunch every week. Mildred would often purchase beaded work and finely woven baskets. Over time, Mrs. Dillman amassed an impressive collection of hand-crafted Ute artifacts. The collection was passed to her daughter Naomi.  The collection was on display for many years at the Pioneer Village Museum at amusement park Lagoon in Farmington, Utah.  In 1987, the collection was given to BYU’s Museum of Peoples and Cultures.
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